macro

I’m doing my IDC at the moment, the PADI dive instructor course. It’s an awesome experience. We’re two weeks into the program and it’s so much fun! :)
I didn’t count with many opportunities to bring the camera down, but we had some dives before the course started on which I could take the camera.

And really: I just can’t stop saying that it’s the most beautiful thing down there.
I never get enough of what I see. And I’m a macro fetishist, I guess.

Baby shrimp

D800 in Ikelight housing, ISO100, 1/250 sec @ f/5.6, Tamron 90mm macro, Ikelight DS-161 + Ikelite DS-51

Goat fish

D800 in Ikelight housing, ISO100, 1/250 sec @ f/5.6, Tamron 90mm macro, Ikelight DS-161 + Ikelite DS-51

Ribbon moray eel

D800 in Ikelight housing, ISO100, 1/250 sec @ f/5.6, Tamron 90mm macro, Ikelight DS-161 + Ikelite DS-51

Nudibranch

D800 in Ikelight housing, ISO100, 1/250 sec @ f/5.6, Tamron 90mm macro, Ikelight DS-161 + Ikelite DS-51

Peacock Mantis Shrimp

D800 in Ikelight housing, ISO100, 1/250 sec @ f/5.6, Tamron 90mm macro, Ikelight DS-161 + Ikelite DS-51

Frogfish

D800 in Ikelight housing, ISO100, 1/250 sec @ f/5.6, Tamron 90mm macro, Ikelight DS-161 + Ikelite DS-51

Nudibranch

D800 in Ikelight housing, ISO100, 1/250 sec @ f/5.6, Tamron 90mm macro, Ikelight DS-161 + Ikelite DS-51

Beauty in all its colorfulness :)

I have to spread this out over a few posts, wouldn’t want you to get RSI from scrolling down too much ;)

Nudibranch

D800 (in Ikelight underwater housing), ISO100, 1/1000 sec @ f/4.0, Tamron 90mm, Ikelight DS161 strobe

Sea squirt

D800 (in Ikelight underwater housing), ISO100, 1/1000 sec @ f/4.0, Tamron 90mm, Ikelight DS161 strobe

Nudibranch

D800 (in Ikelight underwater housing), ISO100, 1/1000 sec @ f/5.6, Tamron 90mm, Ikelight DS161 strobe

Seahorse

D800 (in Ikelight underwater housing), ISO100, 1/1000 sec @ f/4.0, Tamron 90mm, Ikelight DS161 strobe

Sea cucumber

D800 (in Ikelight underwater housing), ISO100, 1/1000 sec @ f/4.0, Tamron 90mm, Ikelight DS161 strobe

The other day I had an Arachnophobia moment. Remember that movie from the 90s with the spiders in it?
I got to the toilet, lifted the seat and found a big, fat spider on it. It scurried away too fast for me to actually consciously register what had just happened.

Today, however, I can say with 100% probability that I most certainly have discovered a new species of spiders, I think.
It looks very much like a brown huntsman, so I would assume that it’s a subspecies. I will call it the 5-legged brown arnoman.
It’s very docile, doesn’t move much, and is very photogenic. It comes over as very natural in front of the camera and is not afraid to wink with one of its 8 eyes when given the opportunity.
It frequents in locations with humid (occasionally smelly) air and laughs in one of its 5 fists when it scares (maybe literally) the crap out of you when you lift the toilet seat.

Brown Huntsman

D800, ISO100, 1/320 sec @ f/22, Tamron 90mm, on-camera flash

Brown Huntsman

D800, ISO100, 1/320 sec @ f/22, Tamron 90mm, on-camera flash

 

Slight feeling of déjà-vu…

It was another night, but I’m not sure if it was another bug.
I get the impression that this might’ve been the same bug as the one from a few nights ago. After it’s been banging its head in the window, since it’s got a massive dent in its head :D

And probably still slightly (or severely) concussed, since it wasn’t moving at all.

It was gone this morning. Not sure if Mr L had another midnight snack or if it got away.
I guess I’ll find out in the coming nights :D

Beetle

D800, ISO100, 1/250 sec @ f/5.6, Tamron 90mm, on-camera flash

Beetle

D800, ISO100, 1/250 sec @ f/5.6, Tamron 90mm, on-camera flash

Before the bug I re-acquainted myself with another old friend.

Tokay

D800, ISO100, 1/250 sec @ f/5.6, Tamron 90mm, on-camera flash

I must say that these “little” loudmouths have been surprisingly quiet since I’ve arrived here. I haven’t heard them much, and not at all during the night. That may change with the weather, though, let’s wait and see/hear…

Normally speaking I don’t wake up during the night for a toilet break. It may be that the crashing of the waves on the beach has some influence on that. It’s been very windy here and the ocean’s been quite rough.
Anyway… The other night I almost tripped over a big beetle, last night it was another beetle. Slightly smaller, and normally crawling, but still of respectable size. This one was slow, though, unlike the one from the other night.

Beetle

D800, ISO100, 1/250 sec @ f/11, Tamron 90mm, on-camera flash

Beetle

D800, ISO100, 1/250 sec @ f/11, Tamron 90mm, on-camera flash

It would’ve been better for the “little” critter if it HAD been a bit faster. Not long after I shot these pictures, my buddy Mr L (proudly named after the L-shape of his tail) came to look what I was doing lying flat on the floor and decided that his evening snack was way beyond due.
So after playing with his food a bit (I told him not to, but he didn’t listen), he scooped it up and crunched the proteins away (I save you THAT much cruelty, but the playing was fun :D ).

Mr L playing with his evening snack

D800, ISO100, 1/250 sec @ f/11, Tamron 90mm, on-camera flash

Mr L playing with his evening snack

D800, ISO100, 1/250 sec @ f/11, Tamron 90mm, on-camera flash

Mr L playing with his evening snack

D800, ISO100, 1/250 sec @ f/11, Tamron 90mm, on-camera flash

I guess I was lucky. We hit the tail of the third typhoon,  but got a few nice days still anyway.
These are the pictures of my last dive (for now). I’ve already planned my return.
Just can’t get enough of it!

Anemony

D800 (in Ikelight underwater housing), ISO100, 1/1000 sec @ f/5.6, Tamron 90mm, Ikelight DS161 strobe

Seaslug

D800 (in Ikelight underwater housing), ISO100, 1/1000 sec @ f/5.6, Tamron 90mm, Ikelight DS161 strobe

Nudibranch

D800 (in Ikelight underwater housing), ISO100, 1/1000 sec @ f/5.6, Tamron 90mm, Ikelight DS161 strobe

Golden cowry

D800 (in Ikelight underwater housing), ISO100, 1/1000 sec @ f/4, Tamron 90mm, Ikelight DS161 strobe

Ghost pipefish

D800 (in Ikelight underwater housing), ISO100, 1/1000 sec @ f/5.6, Tamron 90mm, Ikelight DS161 strobe

 

 

 

I promised you that one still.

Haven’t been able to go out much in the past days. We’re sitting out the tail of the third typhoon here. Luckily the worst hasn’t come here, but with rain -literally- the whole day, rough sea and very strong currents it’s not really diving weather.
My time here is running at an end… for now… But I’ll be back here soon. With camera. And better weather.

Pufferfish

D800 (in Ikelight underwater housing), ISO100, 1/1000 sec @ f/5.6, Tamron 90mm, Ikelight DS161 strobe

Cuttlefish

D800 (in Ikelight underwater housing), ISO100, 1/1000 sec @ f/5.6, Tamron 90mm, Ikelight DS161 strobe

Moray eel

D800 (in Ikelight underwater housing), ISO100, 1/1000 sec @ f/5.6, Tamron 90mm, Ikelight DS161 strobe

The moray eels you don’t usually see out in the open like this during the day. But at night they’ll give you a good photo op :)

The same with the mandarinfish. They are very cute (slightly strange as well), but really quick. And they don’t like light very much. There’s only a time window of about 30-40 minutes after sunset when they come out, after that it’s over. When you flash they hide for awhile and you have to wait for them to come out again. If you shine a big light on where they are, they won’t come out. So you have to shine a light with a very weak beak, or hold your hand over the beam. All of this makes it extremely hard to focus and take good pictures. The couple of lucky shots I got are below.

Mandarinfish

D800 (in Ikelight underwater housing), ISO100, 1/1000 sec @ f/5.6, Tamron 90mm, Ikelight DS161 strobe

Mandarinfish

D800 (in Ikelight underwater housing), ISO100, 1/1000 sec @ f/5.6, Tamron 90mm, Ikelight DS161 strobe

Mandarinfish

D800 (in Ikelight underwater housing), ISO100, 1/1000 sec @ f/5.6, Tamron 90mm, Ikelight DS161 strobe

 

 

… during the day (Night dive coming up after this post).

I’ve seen plenty of colors during the past weeks. It’s amazing down there (I know, I start repeating myself). I’ve seen probably 2-3 different kinds of starfish around here in one or another variety, but the other day, when we were out for a skill set and did a short “tour” just off the shore, we ran into some crazy colorful ones that I hadn’t seen before. Only at about 5 meters deep, about 200 m from the beach.

I decided to come back for pictures.

Starfish

D800 (in Ikelight underwater housing), ISO1600, 1/1000 sec @ f/5.6, Tamron 90mm

Starfish

D800 (in Ikelight underwater housing), ISO1600, 1/1000 sec @ f/5.6, Tamron 90mm

Starfish

D800 (in Ikelight underwater housing), ISO1600, 1/1000 sec @ f/4, Tamron 90mm

I shot only three, but there were six or seven of them in different colors. Unfortunately I failed to attached the flash connector properly to the hotshoe of the camera, so I had to shoot without flash. Luckily this was only at shallow depth, and there was enough light coming in to shoot without flash, but the colors were completely off.

Starfish before - after

D800 (in Ikelight underwater housing), ISO1600, 1/1000 sec @ f/4, Tamron 90mm
And the obvious color adjustments in Photoshop.

And then there’s the time where you just sit in the sand, camera at the ready, waiting for that right moment. It may come, or it may not. But with patience…

Starfish

D800 (in Ikelight underwater housing), ISO1600, 1/1000 sec @ f/4, Tamron 90mm

People have destroyed already way too much, both on land and underwater, but it’s beautiful to see how people haven’t (yet, let’s hope it will never get that far) screwed up the underwater world and haven’t managed to scare the wits out of everything living there.
At first you’re just a big strange creature, but if you “sit down” (not literally, at least not everywhere or randomly!!) and stay calm, the life around you will start going about their business within minutes and you get to see the most beautiful things in their natural environment :)

On the way to the place where we saw the starfish we encountered a few other things as well.
Very common, the clownfish:

Clownfish

D800 (in Ikelight underwater housing), ISO1600, 1/1000 sec @ f/5.6, Tamron 90mm

Very cute, but actually they are very feisty. They will protect their home against anything that comes close. A couple of times it bumped against my mask just to shoo me out of the way.
And of course the lion fish, it comes in so many varieties, with wings, and feathers and stuff, and it’s so gracious, I could take pictures of it all day!

Lionfish

D800 (in Ikelight underwater housing), ISO1600, 1/500 sec @ f/4, Tamron 90mm

Glass shrimps are also very cute, but very small. The one in this picture is about 3 mm “big”.

Glass shrimp

D800 (in Ikelight underwater housing), ISO1600, 1/1000 sec @ f/5.6, Tamron 90mm

More to come!

Another dive with camera.
This was actually a “coincidental” “fun” dive.
I could do a little background story, bare with me, because I will be spewing A LOT of frustration.

Before I left to the Philippines I had lunch/coffee with a Dive Intructor friend of mine, whom I asked for advise and tips on what to do and what to get. She gave me plenty of useful tips and advise, pretty much all of which I took to heart, save for 1 thing: do NOT buy anything that has MARES on it. She did stipulate that it was her personal opinion, and she also heard about people who had only good to say about them.
With that in mind I did buy several things with Mares on it.
1) a mask
2) a dive computer (Matrix)
3) a knife
4) a BCD
5) fins and boots

With good hopes and a good mood I took off to the Philippines to start my Dive Master course.

First few dives… The mask. Brand new. It bubbled worse than a Japanese Jacuzzi and upon going deeper than 6 or so meters it started leaking water in from the seams where the glass is attached to the plastic frame. My first experience with the solid quality of Mares.
I thought it may have just been bad luck, getting a Monday Morning Mask. It happens every now and again, and I’m fine with that.

The Dive Computer, a Mares Matrix, required some custom settings, and a piece of software called Dive Organizer to transfer and log the dives from Matrix to laptop. Came with a USB cable and all. I did the custom settings in both Dive Organizer and Matrix (and noticed when I went through the log book that the dive computer had THREE logged dives already in the process. Typically one dive would be for testing purposes, but *should* be deleted before the dive computer would go in the box for sales. I contacted the store where I bought it, who didn’t know how that was possible).
I had my first two dives logged, and I wanted to transfer them to my laptop. I fired up the laptop, the Dive Organizer, plugged in the USB and Matrix and tried several times to have the Dive Organizer find the computer, all of which failed.
I gave up.
I went for another two dives the next day. The second dive, just before the safety stop (short and blunt for you non-divers: this is a built-in routine with every dive to allow your body to get re-accustomed to the shallower depths and allow the gasses that (may) have accumulated in your body at deeper depths to escape) at 5 meters the Matrix died without any form of warning. I had to stay on 5 meters for 3 minutes, so all I could do was hope that my guestimate of 5 meters and my 1-mississippi 2-mississippi 3-mississippi was slow enough for the 3 minutes to pass.
I contacted the shop where I bought the Matrix, and Mares support straight. I was in contact with Mares Nordic, which was a very good experience and all looked very promising. The contact person at Mares Nordic, whom I had told exactly what the problem was with my Matrix, was going to be in touch with Mares Philippines and he was talking about them getting a new Matrix to the location where I was and then I could return the faulty one to the store I bought it from after I came back from my trip.
Then I received a mail from someone at -apparently- Mares Philippines. Few words more than “Hi, I need more details.” and the signature.
I asked the person kindly what information he had received from my contact at Mares Nordic and what additional information he needed from me. No reply. I asked with the contact person from Mares Nordic. No reply. Two days pass. Nothing. I send another mail to Mares Nordic asking what the status is on the issue of my Matrix. No reply. A few days pass.
Then I get a mail from another person at Mares Philippines. No Hi, no introduction, nothing. Only “Contact the General Manager [name here] of the Philippines.” No contact info, no email address, nothing. So I write a mail back asking about a phone number or an email address. I send it, and then I started thinking… WTF?? It’s not MY job to contact the General Manager to solve an issue. It’s not MY job to try to get in touch with someone in upperlevel management to try to get a solution for a faulty instrument or to have it replaced. I indicated a problem to the source where I was initially sent, and it’s THEIR job to make sure this is fixed. And I’m most certainly not going to call a General Manager in the Philippines or Australia (or wherever Mares Asia is located) with my Finnish phone and boost my phone bill to astronomical heights on top of a 500€ malfunctioning device! I got seriously annoyed.
I sent a mail to both the store where I bought the Matrix (who have been totally patient and understanding all the way, kudos for that!) with a CC to Mares Nordic explaining the situation and uttering my frustration with the way Mares is handling this. I get a prompt mail back from the store where I bought the Matrix, with apologies and the promise that we will in any case fix it when I get back from my trip. I of course do understand that THEY can’t do anything from Finland as long as I’m here. The shopkeeper told me he had also been in touch with Mares, but I guess not very successfully either. And not a single word from Mares.
A few days pass… Then I get a mail from Mares: “we haven’t heard from you in 48 hours. If we don’t hear from you in 72 hours, we will assume your issue has been resolved and we will close your ticket.”
G-sus FF-ing Crisp. I reply to the mail, more and more frustrated, saying bluntly that me waiting for a reply/solution from THEIR end doesn’t entitle them to close a ticket, just because THEY are so slow.
I get an automated reply: “I’m on holiday until the 3rd of July. Please contact me again after that.”
%#&/”(?)!&#)/=!#%!!!
I reply again to the first mail, even more frustrated and even more bluntly, saying that if they want to have things solved, they better not forward mails to people who are on holiday, or they should get their logistics better sorted out.
It’s been almost a week now, and I haven’t heard anything from them anymore. I guess that means they’ve assumed my issue has been resolved and they have closed the ticket. Dammit.
Anyway… The Matrix… I let the battery drain completely, and was able to recharge it. The dives seem to log with the correct information, but -I tried once or twice after that- when I hook it up to the computer or charger, all the custom information I set, like time, date, second time, etc. is erased and factory reset. According to the manual it should manage 2 weeks of standby time or 10 hours of diving. I manage max 6 hours of diving before I have to recharge. It’s a piece of junk. And I will not recommend ANYone to get one of these. Aside from all the problems I’ve had with this thing, I would not get a computer you’d have to recharge after 10 hours of diving. It may just happen that you’re on a liveaboard or somewhere remote where there’s no electricity and you’re stuck with an empty diving computer after 10 dives. That kinda sucks.

I also got a knife from Mares.
The other day we were on a dive in a sanctuary where fishing is prohibited. I brought my knife so I could legally vandalize stuff :D Cut up fishing cages and let the fish out. Destroying stuff with permission and saving the environment. That’s fun. A few days later we went to a second sanctuary and I wanted to do the same thing. I had strapped the knife in its sheath around my right lower leg, checked if it was clipped in tight, which it was and went for the dive. We didn’t encounter any cages on this dive, so I didn’t need the knife. I came back to the boat after an hour or so, I got back on the boat and found the sheath empty. My 60€ knife lost somewhere along the way, because the clip didn’t hold. I didn’t hook behind anything, didn’t do anything funny or stupid underway… It had *just* slipped out.

So… Now the reason for the coincidental fun dive…
We went back to search for the knife. And I took my camera. Made that a fun dive on the way.
We didn’t find the knife, but I got some really good pictures.

Porcupine pufferfish

D800 (in Ikelight underwater housing), ISO100, 1/1000 sec @ f/3.5, Tamron 90mm, Ikelight DS161 strobe

Banded pipefish

D800 (in Ikelight underwater housing), ISO100, 1/1000 sec @ f/3.8, Tamron 90mm, Ikelight DS161 strobe

Transparent Salt and Pepper Shrimp

D800 (in Ikelight underwater housing), ISO100, 1/1000 sec @ f/4.2, Tamron 90mm, Ikelight DS161 strobe

Moray eel

D800 (in Ikelight underwater housing), ISO100, 1/1000 sec @ f/3.5, Tamron 90mm, Ikelight DS161 strobe

Frogfish

D800 (in Ikelight underwater housing), ISO1600, 1/1000 sec @ f/4, Tamron 90mm

Frogfish

D800 (in Ikelight underwater housing), ISO100, 1/1000 sec @ f/3.5, Tamron 90mm, Ikelight DS161 strobe

Seahorse

D800 (in Ikelight underwater housing), ISO100, 1/1000 sec @ f/3.8, Tamron 90mm, Ikelight DS161 strobe

Seahorse

D800 (in Ikelight underwater housing), ISO1600, 1/1000 sec @ f/4, Tamron 90mm

Octopus

D800 (in Ikelight underwater housing), ISO1600, 1/1000 sec @ f/4, Tamron 90mm

Octopus

D800 (in Ikelight underwater housing), ISO1600, 1/1000 sec @ f/4, Tamron 90mm

Octopus

D800 (in Ikelight underwater housing), ISO1600, 1/1000 sec @ f/4, Tamron 90mm

Oh… And then… Tomorrow (day 23)… I will get EVEN more frustrated, because the zippers of BOTH my weight pockets of the Mares BCD will break. Next thing I’m awaiting to break are the boots and fins.
But I’m done with Mares already. I will exchange everything I have from Mares into something else.
It’s a pile of junk and no one really should buy it.
Things would’ve been less frustrating if support had been better, but that just added hurt to insult.
I’m not quite sure how this company is still in business.

 

It’s not all underwater photography and treefrogs here.
There are also “normal” frogs here (and huge toads, for that matter, but of those I don’t have a picture, yet).
This one was very willing to model (and was probably semi-blind after I was done flashing in its face). Much appreciated!

Frog

D800, ISO100, 1/320 sec @ f/11, Tamron 90mm, on-camera flash

Frog

D800, ISO100, 1/320 sec @ f/11, Tamron 90mm, on-camera flash

Frog

D800, ISO100, 1/320 sec @ f/11, Tamron 90mm, on-camera flash